Employment

  • July 22, 2024

    Chicago Firm Seeks $2M For Ex-Atty's Alleged Client Poaching

    Chicago firm Loftus & Eisenberg Ltd. has filed suit in Illinois state court accusing a former attorney's new firm of helping the lawyer poach clients by encouraging them to leave with him, even though the new firm couldn't support his practice.

  • July 22, 2024

    Globetrotters' Parent & Media Cos. Want Out Of Sex Bias Suit

    The parent and media companies of the Harlem Globetrotters want out of a female former player's sex bias and harassment suit, telling a Georgia federal court she failed to exhaust her administrative remedies by not first filing her complaints against them with the EEOC and obtaining a right-to-sue letter.

  • July 22, 2024

    State Street Sets Aside $4.2M To Address Wage Discrimination

    Federal financial services provider State Street agreed to set aside $4.2 million to make wage adjustments in the future as part of a settlement to resolve allegations that it discriminated against some women managing directors with its base pay and bonuses, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Monday.

  • July 22, 2024

    Investment Adviser Seeks To Ax Union Fund's Bad Advice Suit

    A union pension fund that claims it lost $30 million due to bad investment advice it received in the mid-2010s missed its chance to challenge that advice, an investment advisory firm argued in California federal court, saying the fund blew past its deadline to sue and didn't qualify for an extension.

  • July 22, 2024

    Wells Fargo Flouted Director's Dignity, Jury Told In ADA Trial

    Wells Fargo chose to lay off a longtime managing director to avoid dealing with his request to continue working from home to cope with his bladder and colon condition as the bank readied for a return to office after the pandemic, a federal jury in Charlotte heard Monday.

  • July 22, 2024

    Michigan's Cases To Watch 2024: A Midyear Report

    Michigan's highest court is preparing to take on cases that could restore imperiled PFAS regulations, prevent employers from cutting short employees' window to file civil rights claims and expand the reach of Michigan's consumer protection law. Here are some of Michigan's most important cases to watch for the rest of the year.

  • July 22, 2024

    Mich. Justices Say Fired Safety Whistleblowers Can Sue

    Michigan's highest court revived a former Fiat Chrysler employee's lawsuit against the automaker Monday, saying that occupational safety laws don't preempt his claims that he was fired because he raised concerns about potential asbestos at his jobsite.

  • July 22, 2024

    American Airlines Aims To Block Disabled Worker Class Cert.

    American Airlines Group Inc. has said a disabled worker aims to have a Texas federal court certify an "unprecedented nationwide class of all disabled American flight attendants" who can't maintain a regular work schedule and has asked the court to strike the plaintiff's class allegation.

  • July 22, 2024

    Judge Tosses DHS Expert's Defamation Suit Against Fox

    Fox News Network LLC and Fox Corp. on Monday escaped a defamation lawsuit from the onetime head of the Biden administration's ill-fated counter-disinformation agency, with a federal judge in Delaware finding she failed to "plausibly allege" the alleged defamatory statements were untrue.

  • July 22, 2024

    BlackBerry Sex Harassment Plaintiff May Lose Anonymity

    A former BlackBerry executive claiming CEO John Giamatteo sexually harassed her on his way up to the top job while she was fired for reporting his actions may not be able to proceed with her suit anonymously, a California federal judge said Monday.

  • July 22, 2024

    Nissan Dealer Can't Escape Ex-Worker's OT Claims

    A Missouri Nissan dealership is still on the hook in a former office manager's lawsuit alleging she was misclassified as overtime exempt, with a federal judge ruling Monday it was still unclear whether the ex-employee's work involved independent decision making that could render her ineligible for overtime premiums.

  • July 22, 2024

    NC State Resolves Cancer Patient's Fight To Test Building

    North Carolina State University and a professor with cancer have ended a dispute over testing a campus building that contains cancer-causing chemicals, with the school telling the state's highest court the parties are ready to move on from that part of the legal dispute.

  • July 22, 2024

    Retooled Conn. Wine Tasting Death Suit Deemed Untimely  

    The estate of a woman killed in a drunk driving crash can't pursue new claims in its suit against the restaurant where she worked because they were filed too late, a Connecticut state court judge has ruled.

  • July 22, 2024

    Bankrupt Nursing Homes To Pay $36M To End DOL Wage Suit

    More than a dozen bankrupt nursing homes will have to pay nearly $36 million in a U.S. Department of Labor's suit claiming workers weren't paid full wages after creating "an adversarial" payroll structure, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled Monday.

  • July 22, 2024

    Midyear Report: Surveying Vast NCAA Litigation Landscape

    While the NCAA has never been a stranger to high-stakes litigation, the past six months have seen a deluge of courtroom intrigue as college athletes flex their legal muscle amid a quickly shifting consensus on the organization's overall business model.

  • July 22, 2024

    Transfer To D-II Should End HBCU Race Bias Suit, NCAA Says

    The basketball player claiming that the NCAA's Academic Performance Program discriminates against historically Black colleges and universities is no longer harmed by the program after transferring to a lower-division college, the NCAA has argued to an Indiana federal court.

  • July 22, 2024

    9th Circ. Backs Arbitration In Former AmEx Workers' Bias Suit

    The Ninth Circuit said Monday that a group of former American Express employees must arbitrate their suit claiming the company's diversity initiatives discriminated against white people, rejecting their argument that they were being unlawfully blocked from seeking relief that would benefit others.

  • July 22, 2024

    Approval Sought For $1.2M Deal In Labor Trafficking Suit

    A car parts manufacturer, two recruiting agencies and a group of Mexican engineers who alleged the companies lured them to the U.S. with false promises of high-paying jobs before forcing them to work manual labor for long hours and low wages have reached a tentative $1.2 million settlement.

  • July 22, 2024

    Wash. Jury Says Seattle Port Owes Fired Police Chief $24.2M

    A Washington state jury said Monday that the Port of Seattle owes its ex-police chief $24.2 million, capping off a six-week trial on his claims that the port axed him as punishment for complaining about lack of due process in workplace misconduct investigations.

  • July 22, 2024

    Ex-NJ Judge Wants Chief Justice Deposed In Pension Suit

    A former Bergen County Superior Court judge told a New Jersey state court that she must be allowed to depose Chief Justice Stuart Rabner of the New Jersey Supreme Court because he has information about the state's decision to deny her disability benefits application that no one else has.

  • July 22, 2024

    Baker Donelson's 'Growing' Atlanta Office Hires 2 Of Counsel

    Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz PC has brought on two attorneys from FordHarrison LLP and Hawkins Parnell & Young LLP to its Atlanta office, strengthening its labor and employment group and its complex litigation and class actions group, the firm announced Monday.

  • July 22, 2024

    US Bank Must Face Post-Stroke Disability Bias Suit

    An Ohio appeals court revived a former U.S. Bank finance director's suit alleging he was denied a more flexible schedule and workspace modifications to help deal with post-stroke impairments, saying a lower court held his complaint to an overly strict standard.

  • July 22, 2024

    1st Circ. Doubts Calif. Law Governs DraftKings Job Fight

    A former DraftKings executive seeking to undo his noncompete contract appeared to make little headway with the First Circuit on Monday as he argued that Massachusetts law should take a backseat in the dispute to California's more worker-friendly statute.

  • July 22, 2024

    Rising Star: Filippatos' Tanvir H. Rahman

    Tanvir Rahman of Filippatos PLLC secured a $12 million settlement for a former Fox News producer who said she was used as a scapegoat during the network's legal battle with Dominion Voting Systems, earning him a spot among the employment law practitioners under age 40 honored by Law360 as Rising Stars.

  • July 22, 2024

    TikTok Says Arbitration Pacts Doom Former Exec's Bias Suit

    TikTok urged a New York federal court to toss a former marketing executive's suit accusing the company of putting her on a "kill list" of employees to push out because she was a woman nearing 50, saying she agreed to arbitrate any employment-related disputes with the company.

Expert Analysis

  • 2 Lessons From Calif. Overtime Wages Ruling

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    A California federal court's recent decision finding that Home Depot did not purposely dodge overtime laws sheds light on what constitutes a good faith dispute, and the extent to which employers have discretion to define employees' workdays, says Michael Luchsinger at Segal McCambridge.

  • Questions Remain After 3rd Circ.'s NCAA Amateurism Ruling

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    The Third Circuit's recent holding that college athletes can be considered employees under the FLSA adds to the trend of student-athletes obtaining new legal status in collegiate athletics, but leaves key questions unanswered, including how the economics of the decision will be applied, say attorneys at Reed Smith.

  • Justices' Starbucks Ruling May Limit NLRB Injunction Wins

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Starbucks v. McKinney, adopting a more stringent test for National Labor Relations Board Section 10(j) injunctions, may lessen the frequency with which employers must defend against injunctions alongside parallel unfair labor practice charges, say David Pryzbylski and Colleen Schade at Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: July Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy considers cases touching on pre- and post-conviction detainment conditions, communications with class representatives, when the American Pipe tolling doctrine stops applying to modified classes, and more.

  • Biden Policy Gives Employers New Ways To Help Dreamers

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    A new Biden administration immigration policy makes the process more predictable for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients to seek employment visas, and, given uncertainties surrounding DACA’s future, employers should immediately determine which of their employees may be eligible, says Jennifer Kim at Moore & Van Allen.

  • How To Comply With Chicago's New Paid Leave Ordinance

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    Chicago's new Paid Leave and Paid Sick and Safe Leave Ordinance went into effect earlier this month, so employers subject to the new rules should update leave policies, train supervisors and deliver notice as they seek compliance, say Alison Crane and Sarah Gasperini at Jackson Lewis.

  • Opinion

    A Way Forward For The US Steel-Nippon Deal And Union Jobs

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    Parties involved in Nippon Steel's acquisition of U.S. Steel should trust the Pennsylvania federal court overseeing a key environmental settlement to supervise a way of including future union jobs and cleaner air for the city of Pittsburgh as part of a transparent business marriage, says retired judge Susan Braden.

  • How NJ Worker Status Ruling Benefits Real Estate Industry

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    In Kennedy v. Weichert, the New Jersey Supreme Court recently said a real estate agent’s employment contract would supersede the usual ABC test analysis to determine his classification as an independent contractor, preserving operational flexibility for the industry — and potentially others, say Jason Finkelstein and Dalila Haden at Cole Schotz.

  • Opinion

    H-2 Visas Offer Humane, Economic Solution To Border Crisis

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    Congress should leverage the H-2 agricultural and temporary worker visa programs to match qualified migrants with employers facing shortages of workers — a nonpolitical solution to a highly divisive humanitarian issue, say Ashley Dees and Jeffrey Joseph at BAL.

  • PAGA Reforms Encourage Proactive Employer Compliance

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    Recently enacted reforms to California's Private Attorneys General Act should make litigation under the law less burdensome for employers, presenting a valuable opportunity to streamline compliance and reduce litigation risks by proactively addressing many of the issues that have historically attracted PAGA claims, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Opinion

    Now More Than Ever, Lawyers Must Exhibit Professionalism

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    As society becomes increasingly fractured and workplace incivility is on the rise, attorneys must champion professionalism and lead by example, demonstrating how lawyers can respectfully disagree without being disagreeable, says Edward Casmere at Norton Rose.

  • The Show Must Go On: Noncompete Uncertainty In Film, TV

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    The Federal Trade Commission has taken action to ban noncompetes while the entertainment industry is in the midst of a massive shift away from traditional media, so it is important for studio heads and content owners alike to understand the fate of the rule and their options going forward, say Christopher Chatham and Douglas Smith at Manatt.

  • 'Outsourcing' Ruling, 5 Years On: A Warning, Not A Watershed

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    A New York federal court’s 2019 ruling in U.S. v. Connolly, holding that the government improperly outsourced an investigation to Deutsche Bank, has not undercut corporate cooperation incentives as feared — but companies should not completely ignore the lessons of the case, say Temidayo Aganga-Williams and Anna Nabutovsky at Selendy Gay.

  • Series

    Serving In The National Guard Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My ongoing military experience as a judge advocate general in the National Guard has shaped me as a person and a lawyer, teaching me the importance of embracing confidence, balance and teamwork in both my Army and civilian roles, says Danielle Aymond at Baker Donelson.

  • Big Business May Come To Rue The Post-Administrative State

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    Many have framed the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decisions overturning Chevron deference and extending the window to challenge regulations as big wins for big business, but sand in the gears of agency rulemaking may be a double-edged sword, creating prolonged uncertainty that impedes businesses’ ability to plan for the future, says Todd Baker at Columbia University.

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