Washington

  • July 22, 2024

    Wash. Atty Accused Of Offering Witness Incentive Resigns

    A Washington attorney has resigned after he was accused of offering a witness a substantial financial incentive to back his clients who were seeking millions of dollars in damages in a civil suit, according to a Washington State Bar Association document.

  • July 22, 2024

    Insurer Says Bank Must Pay Its $1.1M Drawdown Request

    A surety for an oil and gas operator that has recently sought Chapter 11 protection told a Washington federal court that a bank has repeatedly failed to hold up its end of an "irrevocable letter of credit," alleging the bank owes it over $1.1 million.

  • July 22, 2024

    9th Circ. Affirms Dismissal Of Calif. Virus Coverage Suit

    The Ninth Circuit affirmed the dismissal Monday of a California event operators' COVID-19 insurance coverage dispute after the state's Supreme Court determined in May that the virus doesn't cause the type of property damage needed to trigger coverage.

  • July 22, 2024

    Live Nation Says Seattle Wrong Forum For Shooting Case

    Live Nation wants to change the venue for a lawsuit filed in the wake of fatal shootings at Washington's Gorge Amphitheatre, according to a motion accusing the victims' families of forum shopping and releasing a prejudicial press release to taint a potential Seattle jury pool.

  • July 22, 2024

    9th Circ. Backs Moving Video Game IP Suit To South Korea

    The Ninth Circuit on Monday said a federal judge correctly dismissed a copyright and trade secrets complaint from a South Korean video game developer against a rival because their country is a more convenient venue, rejecting plaintiff Nexon Korea Corp.'s arguments that the Digital Millennium Copyright Act should have prevented that from happening.

  • July 22, 2024

    In Transfer Row, Live Nation Calls DOJ Case Merger Deal 2.0

    Live Nation and Ticketmaster formally asked a skeptical New York federal judge to transfer the U.S. Department of Justice antitrust lawsuit to Washington, D.C., arguing the case clearly grows out of an underlying 2010 deal clearing the merger the government now wants unwound.

  • July 22, 2024

    9th Circ. Backs Arbitration In Former AmEx Workers' Bias Suit

    The Ninth Circuit said Monday that a group of former American Express employees must arbitrate their suit claiming the company's diversity initiatives discriminated against white people, rejecting their argument that they were being unlawfully blocked from seeking relief that would benefit others.

  • July 22, 2024

    Wash. Jury Says Seattle Port Owes Fired Police Chief $24.2M

    A Washington state jury said Monday that the Port of Seattle owes its ex-police chief $24.2 million, capping off a six-week trial on his claims that the port axed him as punishment for complaining about lack of due process in workplace misconduct investigations.

  • July 19, 2024

    Boeing Judge Indicates Blowout Suit May Not Belong In Calif.

    A California federal judge indicated Friday he was leaning toward dismissing a product liability suit against Boeing and Spirit AeroSystems by passengers of an Alaska Airlines flight that experienced a door plug blowout midair, saying he lacked of personal jurisdiction over the defendants.

  • July 19, 2024

    Meta Separation Deals Were 'Overly Broad,' NLRB Judge Says

    Tech giant Meta violated federal labor law by offering laid-off employees separation agreements with "overly broad language" barring them from discussing employment terms or conditions, a National Labor Relations Board judge found on Friday.

  • July 19, 2024

    9th Circ. Judge Open To Reversing Google's Privacy Win

    A Ninth Circuit judge appeared receptive Friday to reversing Google's summary judgment win in Chrome users' proposed privacy class action, telling Google's counsel that the standard is what a reasonable consumer would expect and "you have a much higher opinion of the average intelligence of the computer user than I."

  • July 19, 2024

    9th Circ. Calls Out Wash. AG's Paradox In Christian Charity Suit

    Ninth Circuit judges said Friday that Washington state "wants it both ways" in a Christian nonprofit's case over an antidiscrimination law, with the attorney general arguing that there's no credible enforcement threat to substantiate the suit's filing while also stopping short of pledging that the state won't pursue a case against the organization.

  • July 19, 2024

    Prison Biz Urges 9th Circ. To Keep Inspection Law Blocked

    Private prison operator GEO Group Inc. has urged the Ninth Circuit to keep a Washington law allowing for the surprise inspection of its immigration detention center blocked, arguing the law was specifically enacted to shut down its facility.

  • July 19, 2024

    Judge Presses Govt. On Immigrants' Vetting Delays

    A Washington federal judge on Friday pushed the government to defend a special national-security immigration vetting program, suggesting that delays in processing applications have left many people seeking citizenship and green cards in "no man's land."

  • July 19, 2024

    FTC Wants To Block Kroger & Albertsons' 'Principal Defense'

    Federal Trade Commission staffers want to block Kroger and Albertsons from using their main defense to an in-house merger challenge — the plan to sell off 579 stores — or otherwise force the companies to produce documents so far protected as privileged, according to a recently public filing.

  • July 19, 2024

    Kroger Could Delay Merger Closing To Avoid Colo. Hearing

    Kroger Co. told a Colorado state judge Friday that it is negotiating a potential agreement with the state to delay the closing date for its proposed merger with Albertsons until November or after the court rules on a permanent injunction, a proposal the grocer said was aimed at avoiding a hearing next month.

  • July 19, 2024

    Amazon Gets Tainted Eye Drop Suit Pared Down

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has trimmed claims from a woman's lawsuit against Amazon and multiple drug companies alleging she had to have her left eye surgically removed after using EzriCare eye drops linked to an outbreak of an infectious bacteria.

  • July 19, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Fueling Planes Is Arbitration-Exempt Work

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday affirmed that an airplane fuel pumper can proceed with his unpaid wage claims in federal court rather than in arbitration, ruling his work is involved in the flow of interstate commerce and he is thus a transportation worker exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act.

  • July 19, 2024

    FTC Says Microsoft Price Hike Shows Activision Deal Harm

    The Federal Trade Commission told the Ninth Circuit that Microsoft's recently announced Game Pass price increase is an example of the harm caused by the company's $68.7 billion acquisition of game developer Activision Blizzard Inc.

  • July 19, 2024

    Several State Courts Impacted By Global Tech Outage

    Several state courts have been impacted by a global Microsoft Windows outage Friday morning causing operational challenges and courthouse closures.

  • July 18, 2024

    Insurer Settles Coverage Row Over Wash. Day Care Sex Abuse

    Following a contested nearly $25 million settlement agreement, an insurance coverage dispute arising from the molestation of children at an Olympia, Washington, day care center has been resolved, a Washington federal court announced Thursday.

  • July 18, 2024

    9th Circ. Revives Fired Doctor's COVID Vax Religious Bias Suit

    The Ninth Circuit revived a doctor's claims that Washington State University failed to accommodate his religious beliefs when it fired him from his residency for refusing the COVID-19 vaccine, ruling Thursday that U.S. Supreme Court precedent necessitates another look at his case.

  • July 18, 2024

    Ex-Seattle Port Police Chief Seeks Up To $20M In Firing Trial

    The Port of Seattle's former police chief told a Washington state jury on Thursday that $14 million to $20 million from his former employer would be a "reasonable range" of damages for robbing him of his law enforcement career as punishment for complaining about unfairness in workplace misconduct investigations.

  • July 18, 2024

    9th Circ. Signals Support For Alaska Salmon Fishery

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Thursday leaned toward allowing government-approved commercial salmon fishing in Southeast Alaska, with one judge saying the economic hardship indigenous communities would face without fishing outweighs the "enormous uncertainty" of impacts on a small population of orca whales that feed on the fish.

  • July 18, 2024

    Live Nation Previews Part Of Case Against DOJ Suit

    Live Nation and Ticketmaster have teed up part of their fight against an antitrust lawsuit brought by the U.S. Department of Justice and multiple state attorneys general, arguing that the state law claims are "threadbare" and that a chunk of the DOJ case amounts to trying to force them to deal with competitors.

Expert Analysis

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: July Lessons

    Author Photo

    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy considers cases touching on pre- and post-conviction detainment conditions, communications with class representatives, when the American Pipe tolling doctrine stops applying to modified classes, and more.

  • Opinion

    Now More Than Ever, Lawyers Must Exhibit Professionalism

    Author Photo

    As society becomes increasingly fractured and workplace incivility is on the rise, attorneys must champion professionalism and lead by example, demonstrating how lawyers can respectfully disagree without being disagreeable, says Edward Casmere at Norton Rose.

  • A Look At State AGs Supermarket Antitrust Enforcement Push

    Author Photo

    The ongoing antitrust intervention by state attorneys general in the proposed Kroger and Albertsons merger suggests that states are straying from a Federal Trade Commission follow-on strategy in the supermarket space, which involved joining federal investigations or lawsuits and settling for the same divestment remedies, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Series

    Serving In The National Guard Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My ongoing military experience as a judge advocate general in the National Guard has shaped me as a person and a lawyer, teaching me the importance of embracing confidence, balance and teamwork in both my Army and civilian roles, says Danielle Aymond at Baker Donelson.

  • A Midyear Forecast: Tailwinds Expected For Atty Hourly Rates

    Author Photo

    Hourly rates for partners, associates and support staff continued to rise in the first half of this year, and this growth shows no signs of slowing for the rest of 2024 and into next year, driven in part by the return of mergers and acquisitions and the widespread adoption of artificial intelligence, says Chuck Chandler at Valeo Partners.

  • Opinion

    States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

    Author Photo

    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • State Licensing Pitfalls Mortgage Servicers Must Beware

    Author Photo

    A recent enforcement action from the Washington Department of Financial Institutions demonstrates how subtle distinctions in state mortgage servicer licensing laws may come as a surprise to some companies, even if they never directly receive payments or interact with borrowers, says Clayton Swears at Hudson Cook.

  • Series

    Solving Puzzles Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Tackling daily puzzles — like Wordle, KenKen and Connections — has bolstered my intellectual property litigation practice by helping me to exercise different mental skills, acknowledge minor but important details, and build and reinforce good habits, says Roy Wepner at Kaplan Breyer.

  • Texas Ethics Opinion Flags Hazards Of Unauthorized Practice

    Author Photo

    The Texas Professional Ethics Committee's recently issued proposed opinion finding that in-house counsel providing legal services to the company's clients constitutes the unauthorized practice of law is a valuable clarification given that a UPL violation — a misdemeanor in most states — carries high stakes, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Why High Court Social Media Ruling Will Be Hotly Debated

    Author Photo

    In deciding the NetChoice cases that challenged Florida and Texas content moderation laws, what the U.S. Supreme Court justices said about social media platforms — and the First Amendment — will have implications and raise questions for nearly all online operators, say Jacob Canter and Joanna Rosen Forster at Crowell & Moring.

  • In Memoriam: The Modern Administrative State

    Author Photo

    On June 28, the modern administrative state, where courts deferred to agency interpretations of ambiguous statutes, died when the U.S. Supreme Court overruled its previous decision in Chevron v. Natural Resources Defense Council — but it is survived by many cases decided under the Chevron framework, say Joseph Schaeffer and Jessica Deyoe at Babst Calland.

  • How To Clean Up Your Generative AI-Produced Legal Drafts

    Author Photo

    As law firms increasingly rely on generative artificial intelligence tools to produce legal text, attorneys should be on guard for the overuse of cohesive devices in initial drafts, and consider a few editing pointers to clean up AI’s repetitive and choppy outputs, says Ivy Grey at WordRake.

  • Constitutional Protections For Cannabis Companies Are Hazy

    Author Photo

    Cannabis businesses are subject to federal enforcement and tax, but often without the benefit of constitutional protections — and the entanglement of state and federal law and conflicting judicial opinions are creating confusion in the space, says Amber Lengacher at Purple Circle.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Various Paths For Labor And Employment Law

    Author Photo

    Labor and employment law leans heavily on federal agency guidance, so the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to toss out Chevron deference will ripple through this area, with future workplace policies possibly taking shape through strategic litigation, informal guidance, state-level regulation and more, says Alexander MacDonald at Littler.

  • Series

    Boxing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Boxing has influenced my legal work by enabling me to confidently hone the skills I've learned from the sport, like the ability to remain calm under pressure, evaluate an opponent's weaknesses and recognize when to seize an important opportunity, says Kirsten Soto at Clyde & Co.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!